Help Topic: Special Character Display

Unicode Characters

Our HTML content uses the Unicode Character Set to identify characters which are not part of the standard Latin character sets/symbols. We do this to extend the range of characters and symbols that can be displayed using an Internet Browser such as Explorer or Firefox. Many of our journals contain highly specialised content requiring character sets/symbols that are specifically for and unique to a subject area. However Internet Browsers and available fonts place limitations on the number of specialist characters that can be displayed correctly.

Support for Unicode depends on the type and version of the browser being used and the fonts installed on an individual's machine. These are configuration issues over which we have no control. Consequently, the same article may display correctly for someone with a specialist font or latest browser but incorrectly for someone with a default font or older browser. In order to minimise this discrepancy we have defined a set of Unicode characters that display correctly in the browsers that CJO supports using the default font Arial (on a PC) and Ventura (on Mac). Characters that are not in this set are replaced by images of the character or symbol. If this was not done, unsupported characters would display as an empty rectangle, not display at all or display the default behaviour for the browser being used. This has the advantage of enabling users to display the maximum number of unsupported characters. However, it also means that the level is set to a low threshold so users with specialist fonts that could view the special characters will still see the images rather than the Unicode character. There can also be mismatches in the style of the character if it should appear inside an word that is italic or bold. As browsers increase their support for Unicode we will be able to reduce the use of images in the HTML and we hope that this approach will enable you to get the most out of the HTML content.

Instructions for Windows

1. Install "Arial Unicode MS", the universal font for Unicode, if this font has not already been loaded on your computer.

Microsoft Windows XP

If you are using Microsoft Windows XP, "Arial Unicode MS" should be automatically installed. If you cannot see non-Roman characters, set the Latin-based font to "Arial Unicode MS". If this choice is not available on your system, use your installation disks to install the "Universal Font" as Arial Unicode MS is called on the installation disks. Follow the install instructions for Microsoft Windows 2000

Microsoft Windows 2000

The universal font is not installed by default in Windows 2000 so the instructions below provide guidence on the process of installing the font. However, it is advised that you follow any specific instruction provided by the manufacturer.


Install "Arial Unicode MS" as follows:

Insert the Microsoft Office CD and select "custom install"

Choose Add or Remove Features

Click the (+) next to Office Tools, then International Support, then the Universal Font icon, and choose the installation option you want.

Then beginning at the Start Menu select as follows:

Start > Settings > Control Panel > Regional Options

Within the General tab, select all the languages you want to display Click OK

Reboot your system for the changes to take effect.

2. Set the default font of your Internet browser to "Arial Unicode MS."

Internet Explorer

Set default font to "Arial Unicode MS" from the Tools menu:

Select Internet Options --> Fonts

Select "Latin-based" from the Language script: menu

Select "Arial Unicode MS" from the Web page font: menu

Select "OK" to save changes.

Nescape

Set default font to "Arial Unicode MS" from the Tools menu:

Select Edit --> Preferences -->Appearance -->Fonts

Select "Unicode" from the "For the Encoding"

Select "Arial Unicode MS" as the Variable Font Width and Fixed Font Width

Select "OK" to save changes.

Firefox

Set default font to "Arial Unicode MS" from the Tools menu:

Select Options-->Content

Select "Arial Unicode MS" in the Default Font:

Select "OK" to save changes.

3. Set the character encoding for the page you are viewing to Unicode (UTF-8).

The browser may automatically set this for you, but ensure that the setting is correct as follows:

Internet Explorer

From the View pulldown menu, select Encoding --> Unicode (UTF-8)

If Unicode does not currently display in your Encoding menu, select "More Encodings" to find it.

Netscape

From the View pulldown menu, select Character Set --> Unicode (UTF-8).

Firefox

From the View pulldown menu, select Character Encoding --> Unicode (UTF-8).

If Unicode does not currently display in your Encoding menu, select "More Encodings" to find it.

Instructions for Macintosh

Your operating system should be Macintosh OS 10.3 or higher to view non-Roman characters in LocatorPlus. Use the current versions of these browsers: Firefox, Safari, and Netscape.

To view non-Roman characters:

1. Install the "Lucida Grande" font for Unicode, if not already loaded on your computer.

2. Set the character encoding for the page you are viewing to Unicode (UTF-8).

The browser may automatically set this for you, but ensure that the setting is correct as follows:

Firefox

From the View pulldown menu, select Character Encoding --> Unicode (UTF-8)

Safari

From the View pulldown menu, select Text Encoding --> Unicode (UTF-8)

Netscape

From the View pulldown menu, select Character Encoding --> Unicode (UTF-8)

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